5 Oldest Temples in Jakarta

Temple: Vihara vs Klenteng

At first, it is crucial to understand the meaning of the English word “temple” could be either “vihara” or “klenteng” in Indonesian. So, what are the differences?

Simply said, “vihara” is the place of worship for Buddhist. There are not many statues inside the “vihara”, except the statue of Buddha or Goddess Kwan Yin. On the other hand, “klenteng” is the place of worship for Konghucu. The amount of statues representing each god or goddess to worship are many, even can be over 100 pieces.

New Order Regime and the Sentiment of Chinese Elements

In 1967, The New Order regime forbid all Chinese elements exposure in public. That included the alteration of Chinese language-based temple names. Many of them ended up into Indonesian with Sanskrit influence. Also, all “klentengs” needed to be registered into “viharas” to continue their operation.

Chinese ethnics finally regained their freedom to perform rituals and expose all Chinese elements as it should be in year 2000 after Abdurrahman Wahid, the 4th president of Indonesia, abolished the President’s Instruction (Inpres) No. 14 / 1967.

Some temples either return into their original Chinese name, maintain the Indonesian one or combine both names.

Nonetheless, confusion between “vihara” and “klenteng” remains until today, as many people still consider that they both are just synonyms.

5 Oldest Temples You Need to Visit in Jakarta, that Originally are “Klenteng”

Vihara Dharma Jaya Toasebio 

The 265-year temple is situated in Petak Sembilan area, Glodok, the biggest China Town in Jakarta. The word “toasebio” derives from 2 words, “toase” means message, “bio” means temple (klenteng). Before being inherited to Dharma Jaya Foundation, the “klenteng” was owned by the Tan clan until its 4th generation. There are 18 altars inside the temple to worship gods for different purposes.

vihara toasebio
Vihara Toasebio in Chinese New Year

The foundation name is finally used to alter the original Chinese name during New Order regime, which is Vihara Dharma Jaya.

When the genocide of Chinese ethnics in 1740, VOC (The Dutch East India Company) did the search and burned down residential areas, shops, including temples like Toasebio. After the riot, the temple was rebuilt in 1754.

vihara toasebio

There are original parts remain there, such as red ornaments outside the temple and the green dragon statue wrapping around the pillar.

Vihara Dharma Bhakti

Still situated in Petak Sembilan, not far from Vihara Dharma Jaya Toasebio, the oldest temple in Jakarta was initially called Guan Yin Ting, built in 1650 by Lieutenant Go Xun-Guan.

vihara dharma bhakti

Just like Toasebio, Vihara Dharma Bhakti was burned down by The Dutch East India Company in 1740. Later, Captain Oey Tjie reconstructed the temple and changed its name into Kim Tek Ie. Due to the prohibition of “klenteng” during New Order regime, it was renamed into Vihara Dharma Bhakti and never experienced any changes ever since.

vihara dharma bhakti

In 2015, the fire struck again because of electrical short circuit and burned down the main altar and houses nearby.

Every Chinese New Year celebration, beggars from Jakarta and other cities queue up in the outdoor area of the temple to get “angpau”, the red envelope with donation money inside.

vihara dharma bhakti

Klenteng Sin Tek Bio (Vihara Dharma Jaya)

Passing the narrow alleys and sandwiched between tall buildings, Klenteng Sin Tek Bio is a hidden gem in Pasar Baru (literally mean New Market) area, yet pretty well-known overseas because of its historical value.

sin tek bio
laughing Buddha

Sin Tek Bio was built in 1698, probably by Chinese farmers living on the riverbanks around Pasar Baru, on Jalan Belakang Kongsie no. 16. In 1812, it moved to its present site on Jalan Pasar Baru Dalam Pasar no. 146. In reaction to the sentiment of Chinese names at that time, it changed into Vihara Dharma Jaya on May 12, 1982.

sin tek bio

The temple consists of 2 buildings. The main building’s god is Hok-Tek Cheng-Sin, the god of earth and fortune, whereas the other one is goddess Kuan Im, who is believed to help people in difficulties. Inside the temple, you will find hundreds of statues from different ages, from 17th century to 20th century.

sin tek bio

Vihara Bahtera Bhakti

Vihara Bahtera Bhakti is situated in an exclusive residential area, Perumahan Pasir Putih in Ancol, North Jakarta.

chinese new year
Chinese New year celebration

Its long history began when Admiral Cheng Ho landed on a riverbank in Ancol called Kota Paris (though it literally means The City of Paris, we’re not talking about Paris in France, just to remind you). Sampo Soei Soe, the chef who worked for Admiral Cheng Ho, married Siti Wati, a traditional dancer and the daughter of a famous Moslem scholar, Embah Said Areli Dato Kembang and his wife Ibu Enneng, and finally resided in Ancol.

vihara bahtera bhakti

Since the news about Sampo Soei Soe was spread widely in Mainland China, people from the country sailed away to Jakarta to meet him in person. Unfortunately, he was found dead. Therefore, the temple was build to honour Sampo Soei Soe. Like many other “klentengs”, it underwent name changes for 3 times, from Klenteng Da Bo Gong, Klenteng Ancol until Vihara Bahtera Bhakti.

vihara bahtera bhakti
Siti Wati parents’ grave

Inside the temple, there’s a secluded room to pray for Sampo Soei Soe and Siti Wati on the right side of the main altar and Siti Wati parents’ grave behind the altar.

What’s so special about Vihara Bahtera Bhakti is that the pilgrims are not limited to Buddhist and Kong Hu Cu, but also Christian and Moslem.

Vihara Lalitavistara

The gazebo with golden stupa, just like that in Borobudur Temple, and the only one pagoda (and the oldest, too) in Jakarta are distinctive characteristics of Vihara Lalitavistara, that other temples in the city don’t have.

vihara lalitavistara
golden stupa and pagoda

The early name of the temple was Sam Kuan Tai Tie back in the 16th century, discovered by sailors on the beach close to Cilincing. The history began from the stranded black board on the coast of Cilincing, saying “Sam Kuan Tai Tie”, the name of an old temple in China. The black board was widely believed to grant wishes and prayers, urging seekers to search the magic board.

vihara lalitavistara

Nonetheless it was once lost for years, until someone found a dead body, that happened to be a burglar, not far from the famous Sam Kuan Tai Tie black board.

In 1957, Vihara Lalitavistara was built on the site where the board was discovered. It was restored and inaugurated on October 7, 1989 by the Ministry of Religious Affairs. The chosen name “Lalitavistara” is referred to a Buddhist bible, telling the story of the birth and death of Siddharta Gautama.

vihara lalitavistara

Apart from the place of worship, there’s a dormitory for the monks, columbarium and Buddhist school.

Helpful and Friendly Staffs

Generally speaking, the staffs who take care of these old temples are friendly to serve curious visitors with bunch of questions, as long as there’re not too busy, from the temple history, gods until Buddhist teachings.

Make sure you don’t miss these temples on your visit to Jakarta!

 

 

 

Indomen: Blurring the Line between Instant Noodle and Instant Ramen

INDOMIE: BEST INSTANT RAMEN?

I completely agree that Indomie is the most delicious instant noodle. What surprises me is that LA Times awarded it as the most delicious instant ramen in their Instant Ramen Power Rankings. But I, just like the food columnist Lucas Kwan Peterson, don’t care about how on earth LA Times categorizes it as ramen as it is actually instant noodle, because it tastes really good, anyways.

HOW INDOMIE GETS ITS PLACE IN RESTAURANTS

The popularity of the Indonesia’s leading instant noodle brand is probably beyond imagination of its producing company, Indofood, especially the growing amount of “warung Indomie” or Indomie food stalls in the country, simply described as noodle stalls using Indomie as their noodle base.

In the beginning, Indomie stalls were rather simple just like how “warung” should be. Either in the shape of wagon or hut, Indomie stalls serve these noodles exactly the same way as you cook them yourself with very limited varieties, such as additional poached egg, corned beef or veggies. They sell pretty well, though, and suitable for those who want to to eat cheap (Rp. 5000 or $ 0.30 per bowl) with familiar taste. Especially while hanging out in the middle of the night far from home.

Entrepreneurs see this as a great business opportunity. To win the heart of consumers, they create fancier version of “warung Indomie” in shop houses and develop totally brand new soup and spice recipes. Despite the restaurant look outlets, they still call themselves “warung Indomie”, applying the golden rule: using Indomie noodle, no others.

EYE-CATCHING INDOMIE STALL

Not long ago, I was looking for a Japanese ramen restaurant at Kosa Kasablanka, a shopping mall in Kuningan area, South Jakarta. Nonetheless, there was a restaurant on LG floor managing to grab my attention, called Indomen, with its eye-catching design.

indomen

From the font type of the 3D Indomen logo until the use of red and blue colours in furniture and decoration remind me of a Superman comic book. The main counter’s façade is the combination of Japanese ramen shop and local Indonesian “warung” style, shown by the use of wooden counter and colourful stickers of food and drink list with images, that nearly cover the entire windows.

indomen

indomen

There are some interesting parts when you take a closer look at the illustration surrounding the outlet, from local version of super hero until some words of joke or parody.

illustration

Finally, all those unique elements dragged me to Indomen and I officially stopped searching any Japanese ramen on that day.

INDOMIE RAMEN

At first, I assumed that Indomen means Indomie men, or people who love Indomie. Yet, having asked about its frequently requested menu, the waiter simply said, “Indomie ramen.” Ha! Now I get it. Indomen stands for Indomie Ramen.

The ramen version of Indomen is divided in 2 types, spicy and non-spicy. The spicy menus, as usual in many Indonesian restaurants targeting younger consumers, use provocative names, such as “ranjau” (landmine), “nuklir” (nuclear), “gila” (crazy). Of all those challenging names, “ranjau” is the most preferred one because it has everything in it, from chicken chasiu (chicken in Chinese food style sweet red sauce), meatball, chicken skin skewer, homemade chili and egg. There are 5 levels of spiciness, from 1 the mildest to 5 the hottest.

For those who can’t even stand level 1, like me, just get the non-spicy options, such as “telur asin” (salted egg), original, creamy milk and “bakso” (meatballs). I chose creamy milk, which is like the original soup but mixed with milk.

In seconds, I forgot that what I had before me is Indomie instant noodle. The presentation was so Japanese ramen look, from the sliced chicken that tasted like teriyaki, hard-boiled egg with medium done yolk, until the hooked spoon that could hang in the edge of the bowl. The only thing that was absent is the seaweed on the side of the bowl, just like how it was pictured on the menu.

indomie

Basically, creamy milk is the modification of the original version of umami soup with milk and hints of sweetness. It was pretty good, unless you mind the slightly sweet soup, and one of the best sellers for the non-spicy Indomie ramen.

I didn’t think that Indomie noodle will do great for ramen, but in fact, Indomen proved me wrong.

OTHER THAN INDOMIE RAMEN

Suppose you feel like trying other than Indomie ramen, Indomen offers Indonesian style fried noodle, from “sambal matah” (Balinese style chili), “saus rendang” (Padang style beef in coconut sauce) to “keju telur” (egg and cheese). There’s no harm to try the street style rice dishes, such as the customer’s favorite “ayam geprek mozarella” (spicy smashed chicken with mozzarella cheese) and some toast bread, where ovomaltine cheese oreo is the most preferred one.

Customization of existing dishes are possible, thanks to the additional topping options, from sunny side up, “rendang”, “sambal matah”, to cheese starting from Rp. 5800
($ 0.45) per plate.

What if heavy meals are not your choice? No worries. Light snacks, from “sate taichan” (chicken skewers), chicken skin skewers, popcorn chicken, french fries to calamari fritters are available. Even some are served with choice of flavours, such as chili, mozarella cheese and barbecue.

LYCHEE YAKULT

lychee yakult
lychee yakult
lychee yakult
take the Yakult bottle off and pour it on your drink

It is pretty common that Yakult, the Japanese probiotic milk drink brand, becomes one of the main mocktail ingredients, and Indomen is not an exception. My favorite Yakult drink concoction is lychee, as it brings refreshing and sweet taste simultaneously, harmoniously. It costs me Rp. 24.800 ($ 1.50) per glass and I think it’s worth it.

There are 12 categories of drinks you can choose, among others fresh juices, local tea, Italian soda, Yakult and sparkling soda, starting from Rp. 9800 ($ 0.70).

indomen
drink illustrations

INDOMIE SHOULD BE AFFORDABLE

The other golden rule of “warung Indomie”, no matter how you want to bring it to the next level, is this: it has to be affordable!

indomen
eye-catching menu cover design

I spent about Rp. 60.000 ($ 5) for creamy milk Indomie ramen and lychee Yakult, which is still considered normal in shopping malls, but a bit pricey for instant noodle. FYI, Indomie ramen is the most expensive menu at the restaurant, which is almost Rp. 30.000 ($ 2) per portion. Other than that, you can get the lowest main course starting from Rp. 12.800 ($ 0.90), like the original fried Indomie. Thus, you can have it your way to reach your budget.

Overall, the experience I got at Indomen opens my mind that creativity is endless and rules are made to be broken. Nothing wrong with Japanese ramen made of Indonesian instant noodle. If it’s mouthwatering, so what?

Most Beautiful Murals in Ismail Marzuki Park

BEFORE IT TURNS INTO ISMAIL MARZUKI PARK

Taman Ismail Marzuki (Ismail Marzuki Park) is a Jakarta art and cultural center situated in Cikini area, Central Jakarta, Indonesia. The locals call it TIM, pronounced as team.

The name “Ismail Marzuki” derives from a music composer and songwriter for films and numerous patriotic songs. Since November 10, 2004, he has been awarded as a national hero.

TIM
mural of Ismail Marzuki, the composer

Originally, Ismail Marzuki Park was Taman Raden Saleh (Raden Saleh Park), the first  public zoo and park in the city owned by Raden Saleh, a famous painter who lived in Europe for 20 years to pursue painting study and career. The establishment of zoo in the city center was probably inspired by those in Europe, where several of them are built in downtown areas instead of the suburban ones. The park also hosted a dog racing competition, a cinema, Garden Hall and Podium. Since 1966, the zoo has been relocated to Ragunan, South Jakarta, called Kebun Binatang Ragunan (Ragunan Zoo).

WHAT ISMAIL MARZUKI PARK OFFERS

TIM was officially inaugurated on November 10, 1968 by the then governor of Jakarta, Ali Sadikin. The 8 hectares park houses a planetarium, Jakarta Arts Institute (IKJ), an exhibition hall, 6 performing art performances theaters, archive building and a gallery.

Cultural events are shown regularly, from performing arts, such as drama, dance, music performances, poetry reading, painting and sculpture exhibitions until film screenings.

taman ismail marzuki
the big theater TIM

The Planetarium and Observatorium is also a highly-visited destination within the park, especially for groups of students who are on study tour program. I remember, slightly, did this with schoolmates when I was on elementary school. It’s been ages and that’s when the last time I visited Ismail Marzuki Park.

There used to be XXI Cinema, which is demolished in mid-August 2019, and the extension of Graha Bhakti Budaya, a big performing art hall, will replace the cinema spot. This results in disappointment from the cinema’s regular customers, including students from Jakarta Arts Institute. Yet it happens anyways.

The revitalization of Ismail Marzuki Park is still an ongoing project and will be completed in 2021. I truly hope something great is coming out of it and the dream of becoming the park as one of the world’s cultural center will come true.

MURALS

Finally, after more than 25 years, I returned to this park with a group of people from Wisata Kreatif Jakarta, a walking tour service holding one of their routes, Cikini Food Tour. I couldn’t believe that this place has become more artsy than just being the location of an art school. Without watching art performances and attending exhibitions, the murals has already had their own spot to accentuate the art element at the complex. And yes, you can enjoy them for free.

It was not so crowded on Sunday afternoon and no school activities, except some people chill out, chit-chatting and practices skateboarding. Immortalizing these wonderful artworks with a camera couldn’t be more comfortable. The murals are created by several different painters, portraying faces of the nation’s most notable artists, including Ismail Marzuki himself, as shown above.

taman ismail marzuki
the look of Raden Saleh

Raden Saleh didn’t only owned the zoo those days, but also had a mansion nearby. As Cikini is an Arabic settlement in Jakarta and he was an Arabic-Javanese painter, he is one of the most influential figures in Indonesian painting history.

taman ismail marzuki

The murals make an ordinary building looks extraordinary from this angle. The black mural is the poet Chairil Anwar, nicknamed binatang jalang or bitch taken from his “Aku” (“I”) poet, known for moving and controversy lyrics. One of his statements that the nation hard to forget is that he wanted to live for another thousand years, nonetheless the faith told otherwise. He passed away at only 26, probably from tuberculosis.

taman ismail marzuki
mural of Chairil Anwar
huriah adam mural, the choreographer
mural of Huriah Adam, the choreographer who used to perform at TIM multiple times

The colorful mural of a Colombian artist Diana Ordonez symbolizes a close relationship between the local government and Colombian embassy in Jakarta.

taman ismail marzuki
the work of Diana Ordonez
taman ismail marzuki
closer look of the mural

taman ismail marzuki

taman ismail marzuki

Look around slowly and you’ll find more murals on the façade of Jakarta Arts Institute. I heard that in certain period of time, these murals could be replaced with other images. So enjoy them while they last.

taman ismail marzuki
Jakarta Arts Institute

taman ismail marzuki

taman ismail marzuki

taman ismail marzuki

taman ismail marzuki

taman ismail marzuki

MORE MURALS OUTSIDE THE COMPLEX

When you leave Ismail Marzuki Park, don’t forget to spot other murals outside the the park. They are seriously instagrammable as well! I only captured a few of them, yet I guarantee you’ll see more of them along the way.

For sure, this is a kind of art exhibition you can visit for free and you can visit anytime before dark. Sunday could be the best day as the street is not too crowded.

taman ismail marzuki
mural by Harry Darsono
mural
“I love Indonesia Korea”
mural
“Jakarta gives, never asks for return”

mural

Nasi Ayam Kedewatan Ibu Mangku: Legendary Chicken Rice from Ubud, Bali

Ubud is famous for Monkey Forest, Ubud Market, The Royal Palace as well as shops, restaurants and cafes along the way that are often quite pricey and touristy. Well, suppose you step away a little bit from the crowds to Kedewatan Village in the outskirt of Ubud, that takes about 20 minutes, you’ll find a rather ordinary house façade saying “Nasi Ayam Kedewatan Ibu Mangku”, translated as Mrs. Mangku’s Kedewatan Chiken Rice, on both neon box and engraved limestone.

nasi ayam kedewatan
the facade

Mrs. Mangku started selling her signature chicken rice back in 1960’s on a flea market around Kedewatan Village. Before she succeeds, she moved from one place to another until she has many regular customers and settles at the present location.

Once I arrived at the restaurant, I didn’t quickly take a seat in an ordinary dining room in front of me. Instead, I walked further to find the beautiful Balinese house hidden behind it. The 6-pavilion house is the residence of Mrs. Mangku family and one of them is the kitchen to produce the signature chicken mix rice. The atmosphere is very homey rather than a commercial place and peaceful with soft background of Balinese keroncong music. The scenery is fantastic and the combination of red brick, engraved wood, gold and red color make the house look earthy and elegant at the same time.

nasi ayam kedewatan
the pond

The seatings are situated on the side of each pavilion and some on stage, like the ones near the pond and the rice barn. Most of them are performed with lesehan style, meaning that you will dine using a very short table and seat on a carpet, that somehow similar to a traditional Japanese dining style. Since the house is spacious and the distance from 1 seating to another is a bit far, it is very suitable for those who love privacy and tranquility. Take some to walk around the house, the greenery and serenity are completely relaxing your mind and refreshing your eyesight.

ubud bali
modified rice barn into seating

nasi ayam kedewatan

Although the signature menu is called nasi ayam (chicken rice), probably it is more suitable to call it nasi campur ayam (chicken-based mix rice) because unlike the Chinese food Hainan Chicken Rice, it is a mixture of different kind of chicken-based dishes, from sate lilit ayam (minced chicken satay), boiled egg, crispy chicken skin, ayam betutu (Balinese style chicken), lawar (mixed vegetables) and peanuts.

nasi ayam kedewatan
privacy and serenity

nasi ayam kedewatan

nasi ayam kedewatan
after work

Bear in mind that don’t do what I did by asking, “Is there any other menus other than chicken rice?”, because they only have 1 menu for many years and there haven’t been any new ones ever since. Therefore the waiter asked me if it was my first visit to the restaurant. Certainly, it was!

The only variety is how it’s served, either all contents in one plate including rice and poured chicken soup on the rice or in different plates, where rice and soup are served separately. Nonetheless, it’s the same food. The chicken-based mix rice in one plate costs Rp. 25.000 ($ 2) and the separate one costs Rp. 35.000n ($ 3) because it has a bigger portion of rice and soup. I was hungry, so I took the Rp. 35.000 dish.

nasi ayam kedewatan
chicken-based mix rice

All I can say is I got more than I paid. It was very delicious with all the rich spices penetrated into the chicken dishes and the soup tasted so heavenly. I struggled with the burning hot soup, to be honest, since I’m usually not a spicy food eater, but it was all worth it.

nasi ayam kedewatan
Yes, I sat here!

Fresh juices are sold starting from Rp. 7000 ($ .50) to Rp. 20.000 ($ 1.6). There are some varieties of chips, crackers as well starting from Rp. 1000 ($ .10) for a thumb size package of snack you can get in front of the cashier and the price range for the rest is about Rp. 5000 to Rp. 10.000 ($ .30 to $ .80).

nasi ayam kedewatan
fountain and snacks behind it

temple inside the house

No wonder why the business lasts for over 60 years, how cool is that! I was lucky that I could choose the seat very easily since I came around 2 pm on weekdays where lunch time was over.

My experience tells me (and you) that this is not a tourist trap and nothing scammy about it. You definitely don’t need to empty your wallet for dining in an authentic and instagrammable place and satisfy your appetite with great food.

Nasi Ayam Kedewatan Ibu Mangku

Address: Jl. Raya Kedewatan No.18, Ubud, Bali
Phone: 0361 974795
Opening hours: 6.30 am – 8 pm

museum taman prasasti

Museum Taman Prasasti: First Public Cemetery Turned into a Museum

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WHAT IS MUSEUM TAMAN PRASASTI

Museum Taman Prasasti or Inscription Museum, formerly known as Kebon Jahe Kober, was the first modern public cemetery in the world built in 1795 in Tanah Abang district, Central Jakarta, Indonesia. The land belonged to Halventinus van Riemsdijk, a landlord and a businessman, before he inherited it to the Dutch colonial government.

It provided a new burial site to replace that in Hollandsche Nieuw Kerk (Dutch New Church), now Museum Wayang or Wayang Puppet Museum, since the cemetery was already full. The cemetery area was once 5.5 hectares, but now it’s only 1.5 hectares left due to the city expansion.

Known for the terrible traffic jam and the biggest textile market in Southeast Asia so-called Pasar Tanah Abang (Tanah Abang Market), Museum Taman Prasasti delivers the tranquil side of Tanah Abang district situated just 7 minutes drive from the hectic area, free from honks and overcrowded street vendors.

museum taman prasasti

But nothing eerie and haunted about this place. The cemetery operated until 1974 and closed a year later. Before turning into a museum on July 9, 1977, the remaining bodies were brought back to their families and some others are cremated. In other words, no bodies under the tombstones ever since.

That’s why it’s no longer called a cemetery, but a museum instead. Nowadays, it’s one of the popular places for photography spots and video shooting.

THE BURIED ONES, MEMORIALS AND STATUES

Those days, it was a Protestant cemetery, the last resting place of Dutch government officials and prominent people.

museum taman prasasti
Marius Hulswit’s tomb

Among others Marius Hulswit (the architect of Cathedral Church in Jakarta), Olivia Marianme Raffles (the first wife of Thomas Stamford Raffles, Lieutenant General of Dutch Indies during the British conquest), HF Roll (the founder of STOVIA, School of Medicine during Dutch colonization era), Van Riemsdijk Family (General Governor of Dutch Indies whose son, Halventinus, inherited one of his lands to build Kebon Jahe Kober cemetery) and many more.

The only Indonesian people buried here were Miss Riboet (famous theater actress in 1930’s) and Soe Hok Gie (student activist movement in 1960’s).

museum taman prasati
Olivia Mariamne Raffles’ tomb

Various shapes of tombstone definitely define the beauty of the open air museum, that also have meaning and purpose behind them. The tombstone of Olivia Mariamne Raffles made of andesite stone was considered luxurious at that time. The broken menhir shaped tomb, like that of Dr. Jan Laurens Andries Brandes (and some others), is the symbol of unfulfilled wishes. The Hindu temple look is a remembrance of his merit as an ancient Javanese literature expert.

museum taman prasasti
Dr. Jan Laurens Andries Brandes’ tomb

The most lavish tombstone is the green cathedral monument of Major General Johan Jacob Perrie, a highly respected war hero who earned the title of nobility from the Dutch Kingdom.

museum taman prasasti
Major General JJ Perrie monument
museum taman prasasti
Kapitein Jas

Of all tombs, I personally think that the story behind Kapitein Jas tomb is the most interesting and funny in particular way. Until today, local and international visitors believe that visiting his tomb can make their wishes come true although some say that Kapitein Jas doesn’t exist.

It is said that Kapitein Jas was a name of an extended land next to Jassen Kerk, a Portuguese church outside the Batavia old town, to accommodate the deceased from a malaria outbreak since there was no longer enough space in the cemetery behind Jassen Kerk.

So, I wonder if there was a body buried under the tombstone of Kapitein Jas those days.

Apart from tombstones, Museum Taman Prasasti also houses memorials and statues revealing the situation at the time they were built. The caskets used to bring bodies of Indonesia’s first president and vice president, Soekarno and Hatta, are sheltered by metal-roofed hut decorated with Indonesian flag.

DSCF6127 copy
housing caskets of Indonesia’s first president and vice president

The crying lady statue illustrates a very sad newly wed woman left by her husband who died from malaria when he was abroad. She finally hung herself.

museum taman prasasti
The Crying Lady

The replica of R. Breveld monument with the skull stabbed by a spear is a memorial of R. Breveld, a Dutch, German and Thai descendant who was a traitor for Dutch Imperialism and sentenced to death because he planned to kill government officials.

museum taman prasasti
Pieter Erberveld monument

A Japanese-inscripted stone in front of AJW. van Delden family funeral home, not far from the president’s caskets, is a memorial of Japanese troops against allied forces.

museum taman prasasti
Japanese troops memorial

THE STORY BEHIND THE ANGELS

Somehow, the abundant of angels in the former cemetery triggers a question why the Protestant cemetery looks like the Catholic one.

museum taman prasasti

In fact, the angels didn’t exist until the first public cemetery in the world stop operating and turned into a museum to beautify the environment inside the open air museum. Unintentionally, it shows a lack of understanding the differences between Protestant and Catholic, although they both are Christian and have the same bible.

Most probably, whoever has the idea of adding the angels is inspired by a lavishly decorated church with many statues and paintings, that are more obvious in Catholic churches than the Protestant ones, but he or she doesn’t notice that.

Additionally, even the broken hands were made on purpose to give the impression of old and vintage. They are not that old, though, at least not from the 18th or 19th century. Regardless the accidental mistake, the angel statues are my favorite as they are beautifully carved and accentuate plain graves and cemetery surroundings. I just don’t really care about the reason and the misunderstanding.

museum taman prasasti
intentional broken hand

By accessing Museum Taman Prasasti for only Rp. 5000 ($ 0.5), it is a great place to relax, refreshing your mind and eyesight with artworks carved on tombstones and memorials, as well as to learn about the important people once buried there, who shape the history, influence the present life and future of the next generation.

It is undoubtedly one of my favorite places to enjoy Jakarta outside shopping malls. Hopefully you’ll feel the same.

Museum Taman Prasasti 

 Jl. Tanah Abang I No.1, RT.11/RW.8, Petojo Sel., Kecamatan Gambir, Kota Jakarta Pusat, Daerah Khusus Ibukota Jakarta 10160

Opening hours: 9 am to 3 pm

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jakarta

Happy Anniversary, Jakarta!

Just a very short post this time. Happy 492th Anniversary, Jakarta!

jakarta
Jakarta mural in Cikini

Today, Jakarta citizens and visitors can enjoy all routes provided by Transjakarta buses for free. Tonight, the street party will start in Hotel Indonesia Roundabout or Bundaran HI. CNN Indonesia is having a special anniversary report in the historical Kota Tua area. Picnic and bazaar in Banteng Square, or Lapangan Banteng are held for 2 days starting from now until Sunday.

In short, the city is having a huge party everywhere this weekend!

pub street

Snacking Insects in Siem Reap

Now you can download this article through the following link: https://www.gpsmycity.com/gps-tour-guides/siem-reap-4963.html

SIEM REAP: MORE THAN JUST TEMPLES

Siem Reap, literally meaning the defeat of Siam (now called Thailand), is the capital city of Siem Reap province in the northwest side of Cambodia. It is the most touristic city in Cambodia, thanks to Angkor Archaeological Park, housing most beautiful ancient temples, from Angkor Wat, Bayon until Ta Phrom, where Angelina Jolie did her Tomb Raider movie.

pub street
pub street

However, Siem Reap is not just about old temples. At night, the city center comes to live, especially on Pub Street since there are discotheques, bars and pubs on street – as it is called. But, there are also many restaurants and cafes serving traditional Khmer, Thai, Vietnamese, western food, as well as street food, including insects.

Suppose you have been to Thailand, China or Vietnam, then you know that insects are popular street food in touristic areas. So is Cambodia.

SNACKING INSECTS: HOW DO THEY TASTE?

Usually, the insects are meant for snacking. They are deep fried and served in skewers to make them easier to eat on the go. The most common ones you will find are tarantula, scorpion, snake, cocoon and cockroach, sold for $1 each. For a real foodie who loves challenges, these experience should not be missed. Nonetheless, what if you’ve got the curiosity but got no guts to try them because of their unappealing “look” that make you lost an appetite?

FYI, all these insects are previously marinated and fried before serving. It helps them to get decent taste like any other common meat you eat.

What if I give you some cheat sheet on how they taste according to my sense of taste as the first step to leave your comfort zone? Perhaps, once hater, you’ll become a lover.

Tarantula

Tarantula is a much bigger version of a spider. The 8-legged long and hairy legs may disgust you, but here’s what I found out. The meat is soft and flossy like beef floss and has a savory taste. In fact, this is my favorite of all insects I tried!

Scorpion

Scorpion has a bit chewy shell, if not hard, although after being deep fried. The meat is savory, too, but not as flossy as tarantula.

pub street

Snake

Snake meat tastes like chicken, no specific odor and smell, but slightly chewy. Just imagine that you eat fried chicken skewers with a shape like a rope.

Cocoon

Cocoon has a soft jelly-ish texture and taste fishy, that reminds me of fish eggs. This is not really my cup of tea, but certain friends I know love it.

Cockroach

The only thing I haven’t tried is the fried cockroach skewers. Have you?

RULES OF PHOTOGRAPHY

A stall with insects on trays grabs attention very quickly, especially for pictures. Please note that there are certain rules on taking pictures of these peculiar food. If you take a picture of the stall from the distance, a closer look of the stall with trays of fried insects with or without the vendor, that’s fine. In other words, it’s free.

tarantula
tarantula skewers

However, suppose being more viral on social media or posting instagrammable picture is your priority, like holding the tarantula skewer or (pretending to) eat the scorpion skewer for instance, you need to buy the product first. Holding 1 product in your hand means $1. Posing with 4 products means $4. As simple as that.

pub street
pay first, then pictures. I actually ate it, not just posing

On Pub Street, I found 2 stalls selling the insect snacks like the ones I captured, but the rules remain the same. I even think that both are probably from the same owner.

NO HASSLE FOR CURRENCY EXCHANGE

Last but not least, although Cambodian Riel (KHR) is the local currency, the US Dollar is so widely used in nearly all transactions, from paying hotel bills until a $0.50 beer in pubs. So, for those who have US Dollars, there’s no need for currency exchange in KHR. FYI, 1 USD = 4.063 KHR.

So, are you ready to fly to Siem Reap and snacking some insects?

Now you can download this article through the following link: https://www.gpsmycity.com/gps-tour-guides/siem-reap-4963.html